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HELP US CHANGE THE COURSE OF HISTORY!

 

Help us change the course of history before it is too late, urges new Club of Rome campaign

 

The Club of Rome’s new ‘Change the Course’ campaign encourages young and committed people to participate in a web-based project to design the world they want.

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On the day that marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, the Club of Rome, the global think-tank specialising in sustainable solutions for our planet, is launching its “Change the Course” campaign to get young and committed people to brainstorm on how to change the course of history for a more sustainable society.

 

“In the same way that the Titanic is synonymous with the way that nature showed it was stronger than technology, people today are deluded into believing technology can fix climate change, the economy or resource shortages. We must change course now if we are not to face a global cataclysm”, said Ian Johnson, the Club’s Secretary General.

 

Change the Course, a web-based project, run in conjunction with several NGOs, like-minded organizations and individuals, asks people to contribute ideas for an urgent change of thinking and action. The voyage of the ultimate ‘Ship of fools’: the Titanic, offers many parallels to the current calls for humanity to change course and to get away from “business as usual” path.

 

Despite numerous iceberg warnings the Titanic’s captain and crew failed to take proper precautions, such as changing course or speed. In the same way, we are failing to address pressing challenges, such as financial instability, climate change, natural resource depletion, unemployment or food insecurity, says the Club of Rome. “We know the challenges and we know the solutions. We also know the consequences of inaction, but are failing to make the necessary changes”.

 

Participants are asked to contribute a blog of 500 words to answer:

 

  • What sort of world are we heading for at the moment?
  • What kind of world do we want to live in?
  • What can we do to change course?
  • What could be the turning point?
  • What could be the real driver of fundamental change?

 

The ‘Change the Course’ is part of a broader 18-month campaign 2052: the world in 40 years, to stimulate ideas on future options to shape the world in a sustainable way. The campaign takes its context from one of its’ first reports 40 years ago. In 1972 The Limits to Growth warned of the dangers of the scramble for unmitigated growth. On 7 May 2012 it will launch a new Report 2052: a Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years, by Jorgen Randers (publisher Chelsea Green).

 

www.change-the-course.org